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Economy, Geopolitics

In mid-April, Turkey was in the thick of the coronavirus crisis averaging over 4,000 new cases a day, but three weeks ago President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared “mission accomplished”, and government spokespeople said the virus has been contained. At the start of June, the country opened up most public places with the government eager to wake the economy out of its lockdown slumber.

 

Europe’s tampering of the coronavirus spread, along with Turkey and other countries’ proclaimed containment, has been viewed positively. However, there are still many questions left to be answered about how society moves forward.

 

Even leaving aside the chequered past of the ‘mission accomplished’ claim, Turkey may have the virus contained, but the world economy is entering a great period of uncertainty. The country has flattened the curve, yet it is still averaging 900 coronavirus cases a day and the next one to two months will be telling for Ankara.

 

Turkey’s response has received plaudits from some circles, including the WHO, for its quick response and high-capacity, quick-turnaround testing. But the Turkish Medical Association has been critical of Erdogan’s response, and chairman Sinan Adiyaman said the June 1 reopening of the economy is “too early”.

 

Erdogan has shown that he is particularly sensitive to the short-term economic impact of sustained coronavirus measures after he scrapped a sudden curfew and weekend lockdown in 15 municipalities. Turkey was seeing a slight uptick in cases heading into the weekend of June 6th, but the president said the measures “would lead to some social and economic consequences.”

 

 

Circuit Breakers

 

The original sudden announcement of new measures less than a week after announcing a large-scale reopening of the economy looked like a less severe version of Singapore’s ‘circuit breaker’ measures. Singapore, a densely populated city-state, originally received widespread praise for their handling of the coronavirus, but in early April they had to introduce and reintroduce various measures to quell a large uptick in cases.

 

Turkey’s original plan to put Ankara, Istanbul, and 13 other municipalities under a weekend lockdown looked like an admission that the virus spread had the potential to once again grow out of control.

 

The WHO said on June 8 that there was “no time to take (the) foot off (the) pedal” considering the high numbers of coronavirus cases around the globe. The United States, Brazil, Mexico, and India are all seeing continued increases in new cases. South Korea, the country with perhaps the best virus response, is still working to stamp out hotspots with economic disruption.

 

Some political commentators have floated the idea of on-off lockdown measures in the event of a new wave of coronavirus measures. Thus far, Erdogan has remained particularly aware of the economic consequences of widespread lockdowns, but this strategy still leaves the country like many other vulnerable to a second wave considering new cases remain high and most of the populations can still catch the virus.

 

As the pandemic continues countries will also have to be prepared to adapt to changes with how the virus acts. Turkey expanded the symptoms list for people to receive a coronavirus test.

 

But while Turkey, one of the most important economies in the region, declared mission accomplished in its fight against coronavirus for publicity reasons, the fight against the virus and economic fallout will continue in the long-term.

 

 

Tourism

 

Turkey has a booming tourism industry that grossed $34.5 billion in 2019, and some estimates have tourism contribution to the country’s GDP at 12%. The opening of the massive Istanbul Airport in 2018 sent a clear message that Turkey has hedged its bet on its growth as a tourism and transportation hub.

 

It has been no secret that tourism has been one of the hardest-hit sectors in the world economy with international travel coming to a near standstill over the last three months. As early as May, the Turkish government began announcing measures in an attempt to assuage travelers’ fears and ensure tourist dollars continue to flow into the country.

 

Even with international travel slowly restarting, it is unclear whether high-dollar tourists will resume international travel en masse over the summer. As European countries incentivize their citizens to take holidays in their own country to boost low tourism numbers, a much slower summer should be expected.

 

This second wave of economic impact could wreak havoc on the tourism sector and adjacent businesses such as shops and restaurants.

 

While some are trying to keep up hope, Erkan Yagci, chairman of the Mediterranean Touristic Hoteliers and Investors Association told Reuters, “We have to be realistic, this will be a slow process. The opening of 50% (of hotels) in July would be a big success in my opinion.” He also added that foreign currency earnings resulting from tourism could drop 60-70% with domestic tourism also decreasing by 50%.

 

 

Foreign Affairs

 

With the tourism industry in store for a difficult summer, Turkey still finds itself involved in several potential conflicts that could pop off at any moment.

 

Turkey’s intervention in Libya received a new wrinkle as Erdogan announced ‘agreements’ with American President Donald Trump who sits on the opposite side of the conflict. The Americans have yet to release exactly what the talks were about, but some sources reported Erdogan linked Kurdish rebels to Antifa, the loosely organized antifascist movement drawing ire from Trump as nationwide protests rock America.

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