Economy, Geopolitics

Since the Blockade of a Year Ago, Qatar Has Played the Hand it Was Dealt Masterfully

How does a cat react when boxed-in and threatened with existential danger? In a classic “fight or flight” response, and when “flight” is not an option, the cat arches its spine for all-out might and fights back like a multi-headed demon. That’s what the tiny state of Qatar has been doing ever since its detractors boxed-it in—it conjured up a spine of steel and has been fighting back with all the energy and wherewithal it could muster. The outcome shows clearly that from the beginning of the blockade by Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Egypt a year ago , Qatar has been playing the hand it was dealt masterfully, outflanking one and all at every turn.

In fact, for a lesson on how to engender a multiplier effect from the sum-total of their resources, large corporations planning all-out public relations campaigns have a lot to learn from how Qatar’s Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani mobilized his country’s full cadre of top lieutenants and pointed everyone—including himself—in every possible game-impacting direction.

Moreover, despite the as yet unresolved Saudi-led boycott, the results have been astounding, be that in regard to Qatar’s current state of the economy, its citizenry’s morale and, arguably, the country’s standing among non-involved nations worldwide. Significantly, to help withstand the trade embargo, Qatar forged ahead with newly-found shipping routes via Oman and displayed its resolve and ability to step up—at warp speed—the development of various self-sufficiency agricultural and local production-type initiatives. The outcome? Qatar recently boasted that the current month of June 2018 will show a 50% increase in its merchandise trade surplus over that of the same month a year ago, and that business conditions in the private, non-oil sector continue to improve over the period just prior to the trade embargo.

Going back to the fateful Riyadh summit of May 2017, when President Trump lectured some 50 Arab leaders on the need to stop financing Jihadist movements, it was then evident that the Saudis and Emiratis had whispered effectively in his ear and gained his support at the expense of the “mischievous” Qataris. Trump bought the argument that Qatar was squarely in the Iranian camp, and that it was indeed a principal source of financing for Hamas and other extremist groups. Since then however, Qatar has made considerable strides in convincing those who can arbiter objectively that the Saudis and Emiratis perhaps had it in for them essentially because of the independent lifestyle of its people and their prevalent posture against tyrannical rule. In addition, Qatar argued—in many quarters convincingly—that the free-wheeling Al-Jazeera, their prime news agency, was the precise symbol that Qatar’s neighbors abhorred the most, and that all the other arguments, including Iran’s stake in their oil and gas industry, were but a smokescreen to hide those other core concerns. Be that as it may, public opinion seems to have shifted on the subject, with Qatar looking all the more judicious.

Furthermore, Qatar-skeptics need only view the current posturing of the American camp, with both Trump himself and Secretary of State Pompeo reversing course and working feverishly to finally find an amicable resolution to the impasse in the Gulf, their concern revolving primarily around not driving Qatar into the Russian camp. This became all the more urgent when Qatar recently threatened to sign on the dotted line for the purchase of S-400 surface-to-air missiles from Moscow. For months now, the Saudis have been objecting heatedly to the deal, with Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman—and King Salman himself—recently asking French President Macron to intervene in the matter. They even threatened to take military action against Qatar on the grounds that if their neighbor installed the air defense system, it would put the Kingdom’s security interests at risk.

This now-sweltering episode originated in October 2017. It followed a visit to Doha by Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu that was aimed at bolstering ties between the two countries and, from the American-Saudi perspective, giving Moscow a significant foothold in the Gulf. However, whether the deal is ultimately consummated or not, it is a clear eye-opener as to Qatari Emir Sheikh Tamim’s mindset of not sitting still while awaiting others to take action on his country’s behalf. When its back was shoved against the wall, Qatar chose to fight back, and although the final chapter has yet to be written, the tiny state seems to be holding its own, and then some.

 

 

 

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